12th International Audio Mostly Conference, London 2017

by Rod Selfridge & David Moffat. Photos by Beici Liang.

Audio Mostly – Augmented and Participatory Sound and Music Experiences, was held at Queen Mary University of London between 23 – 26 August. The conference brought together a wide variety of audio and music designers, technologists, practitioners and enthusiasts from all over the world.

The opening day of the conference ran in parallel with the Web Audio Conference, also being held at Queen Mary, with sessions open to all delegates. The day opened with a joint Keynote from the computer scientist and author of the highly influential sound effect book – Designing Sound, Andy Farnell. Andy covered a number of topics and invited audience participation which grew into a discussion regarding intellectual property – the pros and cons if it was done away with.

Andy Farnell

The paper session then opened with an interesting talk by Luca Turchet from Queen Mary’s Centre for Digital Music. Luca presented his paper on The Hyper Mandolin, an augmented music instrument allowing real-time control of digital effects and sound generators. The session concluded with the second talk I’ve seen in as many months by Charles Martin. This time Charles presented Deep Models for Ensemble Touch-Screen Improvisation where an artificial neural network model has been used to implement a live performance and sniffed touch gestures of three virtual players.

In the afternoon, I got to present my paper, co-authored by David Moffat and Josh Reiss, on a Physically Derived Sound Synthesis Model of a Propeller. Here I continue the theme of my PhD by applying equations obtained through fluid dynamics research to generate authentic sound synthesis models.

Rod Selfridge

The final session of the day saw our former Head of School at EECS, Queen Mary, present Callum Goddard’s work on designing Computationally Creative Musical Performance Systems, looking at questions like what makes performance virtuosic and how this can be implemented using the Creative Systems Framework.

The oral sessions continued throughout Thursday, one presentation that I found interesting was by Anna Xambo titles Turn-Taking and Chatting in Collaborative Music Live Coding. In this research the authors explored collaborative music live coding using the live coding environment and pedagogical tool EarSketch, focusing on the benefits to both performance and education.

Thursday’s Keynote was by Goldsmith’s Rebecca Fiebrink discussing how machine learning can be used to support human creative experiences, aiding human designers for rapid prototyping and refinement of new interactions within sound and media.

Rebecca Fiebrink

The Gala Dinner and Boat Cruise was held on Thursday evening where all the delegates were taken on a boat up and down the Thames, seeing the sites and enjoying food and drink. Prizes were awarded and appreciation expressed to the excellent volunteers, technical teams, committee members and chairpersons who brought together the event.

Tower Bridge

A session on Sports Augmentation and Health / Safety Monitoring was held on Friday Morning which included a number of excellent talks. The presentation of the conference went to Tim Ryan who presented his paper on 2K-Reality: An Acoustic Sports Entertainment Augmentation for Pickup Basketball Play Spaces. Tim re-contextualises sounds appropriated from a National Basketball Association (NBA) video game to create interactive sonic experiences for players and spectators. I was lucky enough to have a play around with this system during a coffee break and can easily see how it could give an amazing experience for basketball enthusiasts, young and old, as well as drawing in a crowd to share.

Workshops ran on Friday afternoon. I went to Andy Farnell’s Zero to Hero Pure Data Workshop where participants managed to go from scratch to having a working bass drum, snare and high-hat synthesis models. Andy managed to illustrate how quickly these could be developed and included in a simple sequencer to give a basic drum machine.

Throughout the conference a number of fixed media, demos were available for delegates to view as well as poster sessions where authors presented their work.

Alessia Milo

Live music events were held on both Wednesday and Friday. A joint session titled Web Audio Mostly Concert was held on Wednesday which was a joint event for delegates of Audio Mostly and the Web Audio Conference. This included an augmented reality musical performance, a human-playable robotic zither, the Hyper Mandolin and DJs.

The Audio Mostly Concert on the Friday included a Transmusicking performance from a laptop orchestra from around the world, where 14 different performers collaborated online. The performance was curated by Anna Xambo. Alan Chamberlain and David De Roure performed The Gift of the Algorithm, which was a computer music performance inspired by Ada Lovelace. The wood and the water was an immersive performance of interactivity and gestural control of both a Harp and lighting for the performance, by Balandino Di Donato and Eleanor Turner. GrainField, by Benjamin Matuszewski and Norbert Schnell, was in interactive audio performance that demanded entire audience involvement, for the performance to exist, this collective improvisational piece demonstrated a how digital technology can really be used to augment the traditional musical experience. GrainField was awarded the prize for the best musical performance.

Adib Mehrabi

The final day of the conference was a full day’s workshop. I attended the one titled Designing Sounds in the Cloud. The morning was spent presenting two ongoing European Horizon 2020 projects, Audio Commons (www.audiocommons.org/) and Rapid-Mix. The Audio Commons initiative aims to promote the use of open audio content by providing a digital ecosystem that connects content providers and creative end users. The Rapid-Mix project focuses on multimodal and procedural interactions leveraging on rich sensing capabilities, machine learning and embodied ways to interact with sound.

Before lunch we took part in a sound walk around the Queen Mary Mile End Campus, with one of each group blindfolded, informing the other what they could hear. The afternoon session had teams of participants designing and prototyping new ways to use the APIs from each of the two Horizon 2020 projects – very much in the feel of a hackathon. We devised a system which captured expressive Italian hand gestures using the Leap Motion and classified them using machine learning techniques. Then in pure data each new classification triggered a sound effect taken from the Freesound website (part of the audio commons project). If time would have allowed the project would have been extended to have pure data link to the audio commons API and play sound effects straight from the web.

https://youtu.be/CeUDcPzkEGE

Overall, I found the conference informative, yet informal, enjoyable and inclusive. The social events were spectacular and ones that will be remembered by delegates for a long time.

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